Tag Archives: Hacking

PayPal Sponsors First of Its Kind Intel Capture the Flag Contest at DEFCON 23

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DEFCON routinely presents the coolest and most thought provoking topics in the hacking community and this year did not disappoint, partially due to the first PayPal-sponsored Intel Capture the Flag (CTF) virtual manhunt contest. IntelCTF events challenge players to utilize their open source intelligence (OSINT) forensic skills in order to identify malicious actors intent on Internet mayhem. Players find strategically placed “flags” that are planted across the Internet as breadcrumbs, allowing them to solve the e-case of whodunit by simply connecting the virtual dots.

This contest, (rated Beginner/Intermediate) which is the first of several that are scheduled for release in the near future, tasked participants with identifying an actor who defaced a rather “popular” webpage. Team participants may use any means necessary to track and identify the perpetrator. It touted 17 flags of increasing difficulty and asked questions such as the timestamp of when certain posts were made, how a website was hacked, the owner of the proxy service the actor was using, and finally, the defacer’s real identity.

Various members of the PayPal Information Security team in Scottsdale, Arizona partnered with several alpha/beta testers to run the 6 hour, 24-team event. The event started a bit slowly as players adjusted to the gaming style but at around the 30-minute mark the competition heated up! The Attribution-Team and Killjoys were neck-in-neck for flags 11 and 12. The Attribution-Team ended up capturing the 13th flag before Killjoys in the final hour. After six long hours of competition, the scoring engine was shut down and the event concluded. The Attribution-Team submitted a write-up detailing their investigative process. It was then reviewed by the IntelCTF team confirming no cheating or flag brute forcing occurred. The IntelCTF team confirmed that the Attribution-Team was the winning team, capturing thirteen out of seventeen flags before the others and winning the $500 USD prize. Below is a snapshot of the top five contenders and the final scoreboard for all teams:

  1. Attribution-Team – 13 flags and $500 USD prize
  2. Killjoys – 13 flags
  3. BAMFBadgers – 12 flags
  4. I tried… but failed – 12 flags
  5. StenoPlasma – 11 flags

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 11.48.45 AM

This event was different than past contests because IntelCTF is the first of its kind! Traditional CTFs focus more on WebApp pentesting, reverse-engineering, forensics, and programming challenges where as IntelCTF immerses participants into simulated scenarios of tracking down information about the tools, techniques, capability, and identity of malicious individuals. It generated a lot of interest and excitement and feedback from participants was very positive. Not only did participants thoroughly enjoy the immersive challenge but also asked when IntelCTF would be running the next event and where.

Think you have what it takes to capture the flag? Check out these upcoming IntelCTF challenges and keep your eye out for more PayPal-sponsored information security events.